millimetre 02 

millimetre 02 is an exhibition space contained within a single picture frame. Devised by artists Finlay Taylor and Kate Scrivener this space for group exhibitions forces invited curators to consider and exploit scale, intimacy and the close juxtaposition of artworks.

 

NOW SHOWING

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Yoko Ono, Trevor Taylor, Peter Glasgow

16 November - 14 December 2019, PV Friday 15 November 6-9pm 

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There is a message, it seems from another time or place that’s correct in a sense. Some works here are made on typewriters that are now an antique invention, giving an intimate interface between the user and paper, the ideas and the material output. Another set of works is made on a digital Dictaphone, a decoder.

 

The work on paper by Yoko Ono was originally made in 1963 and nearly six decades later things have changed, it sounds different in our heads, still beautiful but with added urgency, fragile, still in the void, it reads ‘listen to the sound of the earth turning’.

 

Trevor Taylor (1943-1994) was not an artist in the context we encounter here but a maker, from homes to ceramic objects. Here is a typed drawing experiment from 1969 which repeats symbols including ‘x’ an ‘*’ and a “0’. Repeating in pattern’s that do not replicate identically, trying to find a beauty and embracing slight difference and shift, and a kind of mutation and evolution of the codes.

 

Peter Glasgow uses a digital Dictaphone to interpret and print his utterances, ‘hello’ a thin strip of paper reads. The exhibition appears on the now worn and pocked space that millimetre inhabits resembling a notice board, a casual space where these experimental shows are housed as if pages to observe in one view. Peter Glasgow references the online world at once expansive and introverted looking out without looking up. TV, video games and distraction seem to invade. The ‘hello’ printed work is a lonely gesture that cannot hear a reply.

 

Thinking of the interrelated nature of the millimetre exhibitions at Kingsgate Project Space and the constant return to notions of the landscape, Yoko Ono’s small work is central to informing the other work and drawing them into our place in space and time and the current moment.

 

Previous

 

Prelude to a Luna Library

Curated by Finlay Taylor and Susan Johanknecht

13 July – 19 October 2019 

 

Alexis Taylor, Susan Johanknecht and Katharine Meynell, Tim O'Riley, Clare Humphries, Finlay Taylor, Ellie Wyatt, Mary Blagg

 

This collection of images and objects at millimetre02 is a prelude for a future exhibition ‘Luna Library’. Here curators Susan Johanknecht and Finlay Taylor, consider the directions for a library that collides differing views on the Moon and its impact on culture, life and language.

BACK YAMS

Patrick Groth, May Hong, Mayra Martín Ganzinotti, Tom Morrill, Hayley Morris, Sean-Patrick Rooney, Louise Sheldon, Emma Jane Whitton

curated by Randy Bretzin

 

 

Within Alan Moore’s 1984-1987 run of writing Swamp Thing the titular character grapples with an existential transition from Alec Holland, the previous human form, to that of the Swamp Thing – an omni-present embodiment of Nature-total. The once human character fully, and verdantly, dissolves into the abundantly manifold network of environment at a universal scale. This permeated effect on Holland’s sense of individual consciousness, offers a potent arena to explore the frictions and harmonies, we as humans have with concepts of environment and diversity. One conceptual manifestation offered is that Moore’s Swamp Thing grows and drops tubers off its back: these yams, once eaten by a human cause an instantaneous thrust of the human consciousness into the totality of Nature itself. Depending on the disposition of the dining human, this affectation causes enlightenment or a doomed madness.

Back Yams feels an appropriate, and necessary, philosophical reply to our current environmental paradigms, and the political-faction slogan “Drain the Swamp!” (currently popular in the highly polarized American political vernacular).

 

The Rural College of Art - Leaves

curated by David Gates

Preview Friday 29 March 2019 6-9pm

30 March - 27 April

 

via: Alnus, Andrew Curtis, Augustine Carr, Eleanor Davies, Emma Fisher, Ficus Elastica, Finn Thomson, Fin Taylor, Georgina Huntley, John Chilver, Jon Beer, Langlands & Bell, Laura O'Connor, Liriodendron, Magnolia Grandiflora, Neil Gall, Nicholas Johnson, Nicky Hirst, Royal Mail Group Ltd, Simon English, Viburnam. 

 

Trigger's Broom: Kingsgate Mix

Preview Friday 16 November 2018 6-9pm 

17 November - 16 December 2018 

Jo Addison, Adam Gillam, Anna Hughes, Neill Kidgell, Max Mosscrop, Clunie Reid, Alice Walton

Curated by Adam Gillam and Max Mosscrop

 

Magma

Preview Friday 24 August 2018 6-9pm 

25 August - 3 November 2018 

 

Ian Brown, Jim Hobbs, Susan Johanknecht, Edwin Aitken, Mark Harris, Denis Masi, Garry Mouat, Oona Grimes, Brian Hodgson

 

Trigger's Broom considers how the paradoxical figure of Trigger’s Broom, from the BBC TV series Only Fools and Horses, can operate as an exemplary conceptual model for thinking critically, productively and collaboratively about the mercurial life and transformational power of objects in contemporary practice.

In an episode of the BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, Trigger tells how he has been awarded a medal for using the same broom for twenty years, before revealing that the broom has had seventeen new heads and fourteen new handles. Wikipedia now lists Trigger’s Broom as a contemporary version of the ancient paradox of identity known variously as Theseus’ Ship, Locke’s Sock, Washington’s Axe, and Jeannot’s Knife: when does something which changes cease to be itself?

 

Magma was first exhibited in 2011 at the first millimetre project site in Camberwell, London. Here is an opportunity to see the exhibition again - in the spirit of the millimetre projects they can travel through time and space to new venues and into different configurations.

The artists here have all been taken by the various impacts and histories that volcanic events bring about both as fact and metaphor. Volcanoes are an uncontrollable force and difficult to predict, which is exactly why so many artists over the centuries have been fascinated by them. As is the case with some of the artists here, the encounters are secondary, by account or through scientific knowledge giving a certain distance to the views. Ian Brown has worked on a series of printed works that further process images from historic post cards picturing eruptions, these blow ups both deform and draw attention to beauty and horrors of these events.

Portraits by Larry Achiampong & David Blandy

Preview Friday 25 May 2018 6-9pm 

25 May - 28 July 2018

 

 

In the crescent of truth

16 March 2018 - 14 April 2018

Axel Antas, Randy Bretzin, Mark Harris, Bob Matthews and Finlay Taylor

Curated by Bob Matthews

 

 

Hello Earth

17 November 2017 - 27 January 2018

An exhibition of newly commissioned artist postcards by Faisal Abdu-Allah, Marcus Coates, Hamish Fulton, Alberto Garutti, Johnny Golding, Mayer and Newton Harrison, Bruce McLean, Jem Southam, Dana Sherwood, Rachel Sussman and Finlay Taylor.

 

 

So Many Things Have Happened Today 2

 

Curated by Lewk Wilmshurst

 

Myka Baum - Finsbury Park

Bob Bicknel-Knight - Camberwell

Sam Capps - Deptford

Charlotte Cousins - Nunhead

Leah Crews - Ogatsu

Alex Edwards - Bermondsey

James Jessiman - Stamford Hill

Sarah- Joy Ford - Kirkstal

Tom Johnson - Ogatsu

Will Kendrick - Stavanger

Amale Freika Khlat - Beirut

Camila Mora Scheihing - Barcelona

Solveig Settemsdal - Spike Island

Sing Hang Tam Samuel - Hong Kong

Bonnie Wong - Hong Kong

 

of average sunlight (BookMare II)

 

Katharine Meynell | Helen Douglas | Erica Van Horn | Susan Johanknecht & Andrew Turner | Denise Hawrysio Les Bicknell | Finlay Taylor | Oona Grimes | Kate Scrivener | Tim O'Riley | Nicky Coutts | Bob Matthews

Colin Sackett | Drew Milne | Rednell Olsen

curated by Susan Johanknecht and Finlay Taylor

 

2 March - August 2017

Particular Conditions 

 

 

Badges by international artists exhibited at Kingsgate Project Space, SUBStore in Koenji, Tokyo and Tadahon-ya, in Kyoto, Tokyo. 

 

curated by Finlay Taylor

Preview: Friday 11 November 6-9pm on until February 2017

 

 

Markus Vater

Kate Fahey

Gianluca Craca

Denise de Cordova

Sosuke Ueta

Shoko Osugi

Nguyen Thi Tue Thu

Yukiko Kishi

Koyomi Horioka

Haruna Kimura

Kei Imai

Azusa Takahashi

Rina Ohito

Shunichi Iwata

Daiichi Matsushita

Ayako Takeo

 

 

Haruka Nakagawa

Haruka Matsumoto

Miyaco Murai

Ryo Nishimura

Sae Fujita

So Sakurai

Yuka Iyama

Wei Ni Lu

Denis Masi

Flora Parrott

Adam Gillam

Susan Johanknecht

Kate Davis & David Moore

Louise Short

Peter Lloyd

Edwin Aitken

Paul Morrison

Randy Bretzin

Eleanor Davies

Eleanor Vonne Brown

Eva Gold

Eugenie Scrase

The Grantchester Pottery

Esther Collins

Jacqui Hallum

Pauline Wood

Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard

Fernando Saiki

Simone Philippou

Mark Titchner

Mark Harris

Mel Jordan

 

Oona Grimes

Tony Grisoni

John Strutton

Jo Love

Bob Matthews

Nicky Coutts & Liz Murray

Gaia Persico

Kate Scrivener

Hiromi Tsuha

Finlay Taylor

Ettie Roux-Taylor

Tim O’Riley

Dick Jewell

Dan Howard-Birt

Duncan Bullen

Jo Stockham

Out-growth

 

Anna Barriball

Melanie Counsell

Kate Fahey

 

The first show hosted at Kingsgate Project Space exhibits works on paper that present ideas, episodes or incidents of change. Phenomena that seem naturally occuring but the curiosity of the artists have displaced them. The visions are a double take, we are unsure of what is being highlighted and are left witness to a process of altering states.

 

The out-growth of a fly that is a wing, the work that observes this is deposited at the bottom of the frame, oversized and inept, its former use now obsolete. A rock surface becomes bodily or its slow formation somehow made tangible, its fixed form now appears animated. A sugar coated polaroid grows new meaning without any of the plant source’s sweetness, and a print of a tree is altered to contest the understanding of a given space. Within all these works a delicacy of application creates a tension with the subjects being tested.

  

This is the first in a series of exhibits with linked ideas concerning natural phenomena and related concerns from an international array of artists.

 

curated by Finlay Taylor

 

millimetre02 launched on Saturday 30th April at Kingsgate Project Space.

 

 

Works exhibited:

 

Anna Barriball, Moon

Printed matter and gouach

1998

 

Anna Barriball, Room

Polaroid and sugar crystals

1992

 

Melanie Counsell, Wing

Watercolour on paper

2015

 

Kate Fahey, Why is it that dogs aren’t yet blue with red spots (and that horses don’t yet radiate phosphorescent colors over the nocturnal shadows of the land)?

Giclée print

2016

 

 

 

 

At 800˚ the Tokyo Kahuna will be moving to Montana soon, yes they will

 

James Keith

Yuta Segawa

Fernando Saiki

Bob Matthews

 

 

A Kahuna can be a wise man or someone who can perform sorcery - an important person anyway and if you were surfing a big wave in Hawaiian terms.

 

The international artists exhibiting in millimetre02 take materials, earth-bound things like clay and plants, charcoal and wooden matter from ‘earth’ and re-mould them. These things, stuff from the land, are held together and re-emerge, stressing and straining out a notion of wonder and a set of functions and ideas that are imposed by this exhibition’s alignment.

 

Fernando Saiki’s image of sushi, with severed fingers on top of rice seeds, bound with seaweed leafage, sets kinky, perverted tones. Bob Matthews’ structure and sign-like imagery is a sticking device linking and manipulating the other pieces together and referring them to his decision-making. Matthews’ wider practice of counter cultural activity both current and historical is bought to play and collides purposely with Yuta Segawa’s Lilliputian works.

 

These pots straddle a highly focused vision of the world – a detailed worship of transforming muds – exploring the worth of paying attention to the details of our value systems and understanding of domains. They knot together childhood and adult states of experiencing objects. James Keith’s charcoal and paper works bring attention to leftovers, the burnt-out carbon remains and fuel, a double page spread of locked up potentials. At 800 degrees and above materials can be changed forever and with that control we can move to new places.

 

At 800˚ the Tokyo Kahuna will be moving to Montana soon, yes they will is curated by Finlay Taylor

 

 

Works exhibited:

 

James Keith, Charcoal Prints

Mono prints made by direct pressure

2016

 

Yuta Segawa, Ceramic pots

Porcelain and glazes

2016

 

Fernando Saiki, Yubizushi

Woodblock print

2016

 

Bob Matthews, Ultra violet days

Acrylic and oil on fabric

2016

 

Kingsgate Workshops Trust

110 -116 Kingsgate Road, London

 NW6 2JG + 44 (0) 20 73287878 

 

Open 12-6pm Thurs - Sat during exhibitions